OLOW x IGUAPOP

7 MN

OLOW x IGUAPOP

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin”, or “Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor”.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays “slow fashion”, transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity.

This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window? 

Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina.

Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration?

From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” (“Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor”) was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

How long did the creative process take?

It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.

What do you want to say through this installation?

The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.

Technically, how did you create it?

Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

What did you learn from this experience?

That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties a sailor could face. This visual imagery was fused with Zygmunt Bauman’s “Liquid modernity” theory that portrays the characteristics of a postmodern society and its constant search and thirst for change.   How long did the creative process take?  It took about three weeks. We brainstormed ideas for about a week, and once we had the idea and concept it took us the remaining two weeks to project the idea and determine whether it was actually doable in terms of cost and materialisation.   What do you want to say through this installation? The main message, besides obviously talking about OLOW as a brand, was to make a statement against our current lifestyle and society. The upper structure represents our consumer society and the liquid modernity phenomenon: we are constantly changing and eager to always have the newest things; while the wooden cube calls to mind the timeless aesthetics of well-made products that last and are fashionable no matter the time and context.   Technically, how did you create it? Once we had the idea and concept, everything came quite easily. The upper structure was a simple but very exhaustive exercise in parametric design. A sea wave was the core of this installation. We drew this trigonometric function curve (F(x)=cos x) to determine the lateral view and overlap it with a simple quadratic function (F(x)=x2). After this was settled, we had to work with the individual dimensions of the fish bags to determine the space between each bag on the x, y, z plans. That was the most complicated… along with the logistics of how to execute it in real life. The cube that represents OLOW and its values is a beautiful piece of woodcraft.   What did you learn from this experience? That different is always good, that change is imminent but does not imply creating just to create. And that making things correctly and with passion is the key to success. Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project. Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers? Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events. Did you get involved in the creative process or did you give free-range to the designers? I was not involved in this creative process; it was a contest between several students of the ELISAVA school, where 8 projects competed to present OLOW’s new collection in Iguapop Shop’s window. I chose the winning project that would be exhibited.

Eva Lluch is the manager of Iguapop in Barcelona. The shop now has an OLOW-inspired window created by a group of talented, young designers. We asked her a few questions concerning this great project.

Your shop used to also feature an art gallery; are you passionate about art and is it your wish to continue to promote all kinds of art forms? Is it important for you to give these kinds of opportunities to young designers?

Yes, of course, our store is linked to the culture of art and design. We have organised several art exhibitions and asked different artists to create textile caps for us. We like to galvanize our space with art and design-related events.

For this Spring/Summer season, Iguapop in Barcelona has a new shop window starring OLOW! Created by a group of students from the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona, who won a contest to conceive their Liquid Modernity concept, the window was inspired by a saying found in the catalogue of our Marée Basse collection: "Une mer calme n'a jamais fait un bon marin", or "Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor". This concept portrays a sailor who tries to navigate through society, trying to keep his principles afloat despite the storm. To reinterpret this society, the students were inspired by Zygmunt Bauman’s book Liquid Modernity, which introduced this idea of liquid modernity: a society represented by a man faced with uncertainty and ambivalent feelings, a nomad, a man with no traditional patterns but self-chosen ones, with an emphasis on change and an immersion into the fast-paced consumerism of our time. The changing and tormented seas are thus a metaphor for this society and its volume economy. On the contrary, OLOW, the sailor, portrays "slow fashion", transmitting more traditional and honest values, prioritising to quality over quantity. This idea shapes the showcase in the Iguapop Shop, which a few years ago was also a contemporary art gallery and still maintains that essence. With the proposed design, the shop window forms part of the shop’s interior, creating a specific space for the brand within its commercial space. We at OLOW are incredibly pleased and flattered to be the window’s guest of honour, so we decided to interview the talented designers to get to know them more and better understand their concept. We also asked Eva Lluch, Iguapop’s owner, a few questions about her shop and her desire to feature art prominently inside it. Hello everyone! You are students at the Elisava School of Design in Barcelona; could you tell us about yourselves and how you feel upon designing this incredibly creative and beautiful window?  Hello! For us, the success of our project is thanks to the team members. We are a mix of personalities and all have our own distinct abilities. The fact that we come from such varied backgrounds and are of different ages was definitely key: Anayansi Diaz is a 24-year-old industrial designer from Mexico DF, Marta Meléndez Rújula is also 24 and an industrial design engineer from Zaragoza in Spain, Joaquin Acevedo Cordon is a 31-year-old industrial designer from Chile and finally, Micaela Seresini Fernandez is a 28-year-old architect from Mar del Plata in Argentina. Having diverse understandings and multiple points of view on one same brief and concept gave us infinite options and ideas to explore! On the other hand, we think work relies on the exploration of how we construct our identities and how we all have a fascination for speculating over the “FUTURE”. What was your starting point to the concept? What was your main inspiration? From a very personal point of view, the catalogue’s aesthetic with its very evident marine theme was the trigger. The proverb “Une mer calme n’a jamais fait un bon marin” ("Smooth seas never made a skilled sailor") was definitely an inspiration. Every single thing we thought about orbited around the idea of the sea and the various difficulties 

                                

                                                                    <div class=

Interview réalisée par lucilequeru
Desperately Seeking Susan
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How to order?

Please follow the following instructions in order to submit an Order:

  1. Visit the Website;

  2. Follow the instructions on the Website to place your orders and especially the instructions given to create a Customer account;

  3. Fulfil the Ordering form. After extended inactivity you may encounter an automatic cancellation of the Goods you submitted. You shall start a new Order of any Good and Service you wished to order;

  4. You shall check the Goods and Services you Order, and if necessary, please identify and correct the error;

  5. Confirm the Order, the Total Price as well as the All-Inclusive Price (the “Order Confirmation”);

  6. Follow the payment Website instructions in order to pay the All-Inclusive Price.

After you have submitted an order, the Customer receives by email and without delay a confirmation of his approval of the Order.

The Customer also receives by email and without delay, a receipt of the order sent electronically, regarding as a confirmation of the order (“Order Confirmation”).

The Customer receives electronically, the confirmation that the Goods have been dispatched.

The delivery shall take place at the location indicated by the Customer at the time of the Order.

Additionally, by undertaking these different steps to Order, the Customer accepts to strictly comply with this Agreement, in accordance with section 1316-1 of the French Civil Code.

The Vendor undertakes to deliver the Goods and Services subject of the Order Confirmation. In the event that a Good ordered is unavailable, the Vendor will promptly inform the Customer about this.

However, under section L.122-1 of the French Consumer Code, the Vendor reserves the right to cancel your Order if the Order is abnormal, involves bad faith or for any other reason that is under the sole discretion of the Vendor. The Vendor also reserves the right to reject orders from any customer with whom the Vendor have an ongoing legal dispute regarding a prior order.

Place of Delivery

The place of Delivery shall be determined by the Customer within the Territory, under sanction to refuse the Order.

The Customer is exclusively responsible for any error in the Delivery due to a lack of indication contained in the Order.

Amount of Delivery Charges

The amount of Delivery Charges depends upon the amount of the Order and upon the Method of Delivery the Customer chooses. In any case, the amount of Delivery Charges shall be indicated to you before the Order Confirmation.

The Delivery Charges are free if the amount exceeds EUR 200,00.

Delivery Term

Delivery Terms are available for review on the Website. They may change depending on the availability of the Goods subject of the Order.

Delivery Terms are expressed in working days and correspond to an average time for preparing and shipping the Order to the Customer.

Delivery Terms shall begin to run at the Order Confirmation date.

Delays

In the event of delays in the Delivery, the Order is not cancelled. The Vendor shall inform the Customer by electronic mail that the delivery will take place later than what was contemplated by the Parties. You will be then entitled to decide whether to confirm or cancel your order and shall send to the Vendor a cancellation notice of the Order at service-client@olow.fr.

If the Order has not been shipped yet at the time the Vendor receives the cancellation notice, the Delivery is effectively cancelled and the Customer is reimbursed of the payment he/she made, within fifteen (15) days from the receipt of the cancellation notice.

If the Order has been shipped at the time the Vendor receives cancellation notice, the Customer is still entitled to cancel the order by refusing the Delivery. The Vendor shall then reimburse the Customer of the payment he/she made, within fifteen (15) days from receipt of the returned products in the same condition as they were sent and must have their original label. The return expenses remain at the cost of the Customer.

Tracking

The Customer can follow the track progress of his/her Order on his/her account on the Website. Regarding the delivery progress, the Customer shall contact the Company to obtain a tracker number, to follow the progress.

Prix et délais de livraison précis

Shipping cost

> 1 kg1 > 2 kg2 > 4kg
5.56.57

Delivery time

3-5 working days

Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Chypre, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Malte, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, République Tchèque, Suède, Ukraine

Shipping cost

> 2 kg2 > 4kg
9.511.5

Delivery time

4-7 working days

Andorre, Biélorussie, Croatie, Islande, Monaco, Norvège, Royaume-Uni, Russie, Suisse, Turquie

Shipping cost

> 2 kg2 > 4kg
9.511.5

Delivery time

5-8 working days

Bahamas, Canada, États-Unis, Mexique

Shipping cost

> 1.5 kg1.5 > 4kg
1519.5

Delivery time

5-9 working days

Argentine, Brésil, Chili

Shipping cost

€27

Delivery time

6-9 working days

Arabie Saoudite, Bahreïn, Chine, Corée du Sud, Émirats Arabes Unis, Hong-Kong, Indonésie, Israël, Japon, Malaisie, Qatar, Singapour, Taiwan

Shipping cost

€24

Delivery time

4-7 working days

Australie, Nouvelle-Zélande

Shipping cost

€27

Delivery time

6-10 working days

Returns

You have received your order but the product does not suit you?

You can return your products within 15 days of receiving your package, for any order.

The items must not have been worn, washed or damaged and must be returned in their original packaging, in perfect condition for resale.

How do I return my package from France?

To return your parcel, it is very simple :

  1. Go to “My account”, in the “My purchases” section,

  2. In the list of your orders, select your order,

  3. If your order is eligible for return, please tick each product you wish to return. If a product has been ordered in several copies, you can indicate the quantity to be returned.

  4. Indicate the reason for the return at the bottom of the order details and click on “Request a return”. You can track your return request in the “Returns” section of the “My purchases” section.

  5. Once your return request has been validated by our team, simply download the return form and place it in your package.

  6. Send your package to the address indicated on the return form.

Want to make a return request with a guest account?

It's very easy : contact us by email at service-client@olow.fr indicating your order number, the items you wish to return and whether you wish to request a refund, a credit note or an exchange.

The return costs are at the customer's expense (cost of shipping by the transporter chosen by the customer and any other related costs: customs duties, taxes, etc.).

How long does it take to get my money back once my package has been sent?

Refunds will be made within 10 days of receipt of your items and automatically to the account associated with the credit card used for payment or to the Paypal account used for payment.

Is it possible to return my item in the shop?

No, for all internet orders, returns can only be made to the address mentioned above.

What can I do if my item has a defect?

We take great care in the manufacture and finishing of our products. However, if you wish to report a manufacturing defect on a product, we invite you to contact our customer service by e-mail: service-client@olow.fr.

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How to order?

Please follow the following instructions in order to submit an Order:

  1. Visit the Website;

  2. Follow the instructions on the Website to place your orders and especially the instructions given to create a Customer account;

  3. Fulfil the Ordering form. After extended inactivity you may encounter an automatic cancellation of the Goods you submitted. You shall start a new Order of any Good and Service you wished to order;

  4. You shall check the Goods and Services you Order, and if necessary, please identify and correct the error;

  5. Confirm the Order, the Total Price as well as the All-Inclusive Price (the “Order Confirmation”);

  6. Follow the payment Website instructions in order to pay the All-Inclusive Price.

After you have submitted an order, the Customer receives by email and without delay a confirmation of his approval of the Order.

The Customer also receives by email and without delay, a receipt of the order sent electronically, regarding as a confirmation of the order (“Order Confirmation”).

The Customer receives electronically, the confirmation that the Goods have been dispatched.

The delivery shall take place at the location indicated by the Customer at the time of the Order.

Additionally, by undertaking these different steps to Order, the Customer accepts to strictly comply with this Agreement, in accordance with section 1316-1 of the French Civil Code.

The Vendor undertakes to deliver the Goods and Services subject of the Order Confirmation. In the event that a Good ordered is unavailable, the Vendor will promptly inform the Customer about this.

However, under section L.122-1 of the French Consumer Code, the Vendor reserves the right to cancel your Order if the Order is abnormal, involves bad faith or for any other reason that is under the sole discretion of the Vendor. The Vendor also reserves the right to reject orders from any customer with whom the Vendor have an ongoing legal dispute regarding a prior order.

Place of Delivery

The place of Delivery shall be determined by the Customer within the Territory, under sanction to refuse the Order.

The Customer is exclusively responsible for any error in the Delivery due to a lack of indication contained in the Order.

Amount of Delivery Charges

The amount of Delivery Charges depends upon the amount of the Order and upon the Method of Delivery the Customer chooses. In any case, the amount of Delivery Charges shall be indicated to you before the Order Confirmation.

The Delivery Charges are free if the amount exceeds EUR 200,00.

Delivery Term

Delivery Terms are available for review on the Website. They may change depending on the availability of the Goods subject of the Order.

Delivery Terms are expressed in working days and correspond to an average time for preparing and shipping the Order to the Customer.

Delivery Terms shall begin to run at the Order Confirmation date.

Delays

In the event of delays in the Delivery, the Order is not cancelled. The Vendor shall inform the Customer by electronic mail that the delivery will take place later than what was contemplated by the Parties. You will be then entitled to decide whether to confirm or cancel your order and shall send to the Vendor a cancellation notice of the Order at service-client@olow.fr.

If the Order has not been shipped yet at the time the Vendor receives the cancellation notice, the Delivery is effectively cancelled and the Customer is reimbursed of the payment he/she made, within fifteen (15) days from the receipt of the cancellation notice.

If the Order has been shipped at the time the Vendor receives cancellation notice, the Customer is still entitled to cancel the order by refusing the Delivery. The Vendor shall then reimburse the Customer of the payment he/she made, within fifteen (15) days from receipt of the returned products in the same condition as they were sent and must have their original label. The return expenses remain at the cost of the Customer.

Tracking

The Customer can follow the track progress of his/her Order on his/her account on the Website. Regarding the delivery progress, the Customer shall contact the Company to obtain a tracker number, to follow the progress.

Prix et délais de livraison précis

Shipping cost

> 1 kg1 > 2 kg2 > 4kg
5.56.57

Delivery time

3-5 working days

Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Chypre, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Malte, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, République Tchèque, Suède, Ukraine

Shipping cost

> 2 kg2 > 4kg
9.511.5

Delivery time

4-7 working days

Andorre, Biélorussie, Croatie, Islande, Monaco, Norvège, Royaume-Uni, Russie, Suisse, Turquie

Shipping cost

> 2 kg2 > 4kg
9.511.5

Delivery time

5-8 working days

Bahamas, Canada, États-Unis, Mexique

Shipping cost

> 1.5 kg1.5 > 4kg
1519.5

Delivery time

5-9 working days

Argentine, Brésil, Chili

Shipping cost

€27

Delivery time

6-9 working days

Arabie Saoudite, Bahreïn, Chine, Corée du Sud, Émirats Arabes Unis, Hong-Kong, Indonésie, Israël, Japon, Malaisie, Qatar, Singapour, Taiwan

Shipping cost

€24

Delivery time

4-7 working days

Australie, Nouvelle-Zélande

Shipping cost

€27

Delivery time

6-10 working days

Returns

You have received your order but the product does not suit you?

You can return your products within 15 days of receiving your package, for any order.

The items must not have been worn, washed or damaged and must be returned in their original packaging, in perfect condition for resale.

How do I return my package from France?

To return your parcel, it is very simple :

  1. Go to “My account”, in the “My purchases” section,

  2. In the list of your orders, select your order,

  3. If your order is eligible for return, please tick each product you wish to return. If a product has been ordered in several copies, you can indicate the quantity to be returned.

  4. Indicate the reason for the return at the bottom of the order details and click on “Request a return”. You can track your return request in the “Returns” section of the “My purchases” section.

  5. Once your return request has been validated by our team, simply download the return form and place it in your package.

  6. Send your package to the address indicated on the return form.

Want to make a return request with a guest account?

It's very easy : contact us by email at service-client@olow.fr indicating your order number, the items you wish to return and whether you wish to request a refund, a credit note or an exchange.

The return costs are at the customer's expense (cost of shipping by the transporter chosen by the customer and any other related costs: customs duties, taxes, etc.).

How long does it take to get my money back once my package has been sent?

Refunds will be made within 10 days of receipt of your items and automatically to the account associated with the credit card used for payment or to the Paypal account used for payment.

Is it possible to return my item in the shop?

No, for all internet orders, returns can only be made to the address mentioned above.

What can I do if my item has a defect?

We take great care in the manufacture and finishing of our products. However, if you wish to report a manufacturing defect on a product, we invite you to contact our customer service by e-mail: service-client@olow.fr.

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